Quality and Safety in Health Care

A survey on what pharmacists and physicians caring for nursing home residents expect of user-friendly lists of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP lists).

Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP, including potentially inappropriate medication, PIM) is frequent. In research and practice, the use of PIP lists could optimize a patient's medication. However, they are barely used, possibly because of their limited user-friendliness. This study aimed at evaluating the opinions of pharmacists and physicians caring for nursing home residents on user-friendliness as well as knowledge and current use of PIP lists.

Results
A total of 30 practitioners participated in the survey, eight of whom were interviewed by phone. 43 % (13/30) of the participants had already heard of PIP lists, and 46 % (6/13) of them made use of a PIP list. Less experienced professionals had more often heard of PIP lists than more experienced ones. The most important aspects of user-friendliness were: time required to use the list, electronic availability, clear structure and provision of reasons, why a medication is potentially inappropriate. Physicians more often than pharmacists preferred a PIP list adapted to the Swiss drug market.

Conclusion
In order for PIP lists to be used more frequently, the aspects of user-friendliness should be taken into account. Personalizable PIP lists could be an interesting development.

Source
Zeitschrift für Evidenz, Fortbildung und Qualität im Gesundheitswesen

Authors
Simone C.Lüscher, Kurt E.Hersbergera, Lea D.Brühwiler

Abstract